PEER Print Companion

Product code :509613

Introducing the print companion to PEER!


Whether you're "all in" on the new transformed PEER  or just using the print companion, PEER is the best content review and self-assessment study tool.  The print companion has 460 questions and answers with more than 100 full-color pictorial stimuli and PEER Point images!

  • Separate books for questions and answers
  • A handy where’s that question about … index for the Questions book
  • A subject index for the Answers book
  • Mixed questions for all 20 EM categories
  • New features include PEER Point™ and PEER Review

Adding on the print companion to your existing PEER membership? Be sure to check your email for your special promo code!

Do you want to earn CME credit for PEER?
Join with a 1-year membership. The PEER print companion is not approved for CME credit, but the annual membership includes up to 150 AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ at no extra charge.

Questions?
We're happy to help! Contact us at 844.381.0911.

USD $331.00 /Each
Member Price: USD $198.00 /Each

Mary Jo Wagner, MD, FACEP

Editor-in-Chief

Chief Academic Officer/Designated Institutional Official

CMU Health

Saginaw, Michigan

Professor, Emergency Medicine 

Central Michigan University College of Medicine

Mt. Pleasant, Michigan

Table of Contents - Questions

Publisher’s Notice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii

About the Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii

PEER Editorial Board. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv

Contributors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi

ACEP Educational Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii

Disclosures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii

From the Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii

Reference Ranges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x

Abbreviations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi

Questions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

PEER Image Credits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151

“Where’s that question about …?”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153

Table of Contents - Answers

Publisher’s Notice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii

About the Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii

PEER Editorial Board. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv

Contributors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi

ACEP Educational Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii

Disclosures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii

Answers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 541

Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .549

PEER Editorial Board

The American College of Emergency Physicians gratefully acknowledges the contributions of the PEER IX Editorial Board in the development and writing of the PEER IX questions and answer explanations.


Mary Jo Wagner, MD, FACEP

Editor-in-Chief

Chief Academic Officer/Designated Institutional Official
CMU Health
Saginaw, Michigan
Professor, Emergency Medicine 
Central Michigan University College of Medicine
Mt. Pleasant, Michigan

Christopher S. Amato, MD, FAAP, FACEP

Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics, Sidney Kimmel, Medical College 

Director Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship Medical Director, Pediatric Advanced Life Support - Atlantic 

Attending Physician, Pediatric Emergency Medicine Morristown Memorial Hospital /Goryeb Children's Hospital
Morristown, New Jersey

Sharon Bord, MD, FACEP

Assistant Professor
Co-director of Medical Student Education
Department of Emergency Medicine
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, Maryland


William J. Brady, MD

Professor of Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine
The David A. Harrison Distinguished Educator Medical Director
University of Virginia School of Medicine
Charlottesville, Virginia


David Bruner, MD, FAAEM

Associate Program Director
Naval Medical Center San Diego Assistant
Adjunct Professor of Military and Emergency
Medicine, USUHS
Bethesda, Maryland


Tina Choudhri, MD

Associate Program Director
The George Washington University Emergency Medicine Residency
Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine
The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences
Washington, District of Columbia

Michele L. Dorfsman, MD, FACEP

Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center,
Presbyterian Hospital
Program Director
University of Pittsburgh Emergency Medicine Residency
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Daniel A. Handel, MD, MBA, MPH, FACEP

Chief Medical Officer and Executive Medical Director
Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine
Charleston, South Carolina

Hans Roberts House, MD, MACM, FACEP
Professor
Vice Chair for Education
Department of Emergency Medicine,
University of Iowa
Iowa City, Iowa

Eric Legome, MD, FACEP

Chair, Emergency Medicine
Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai West Hospitals Vice Chair, Academic Affairs Mount Sinai Emergency Medicine System
New York, New York

Rachel Liu, MD

Director of Bedside Ultrasound Education
Associate Director, Emergency Ultrasound Section
Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine
Yale University School of Medicine
New Haven, Connecticut

Erik K. Nordquist, MD

Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine 
Cook County Health and Hospitals System
Rush Medical College
Chicago, Illinois

Charles W. O’Connell, MD

Clinical Professor 
Department of Emergency Medicine - Division of Medical Toxicology
University of California San Diego
Scripps Clinical Medical Group
San Diego, California

Joseph S. Palter, MD

Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
Cook County Health and Hospitals System
Rush Medical College
Chicago, Illinois

Aaron Schneir, MD, FACEP, FACMT, FAAEM
Professor of Clinical Medicine
Division of Medical Toxicology
Department of Emergency Medicine
University of California, San Diego Health System   
San Diego, California


Semhar Z. Tewelde, MD, FACEP, FAAEM
Assistant Residency Program Director
Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine
University of Maryland School of Medicine
Baltimore, Maryland


Adam Z. Tobias, MD, MPH, FACEP
Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Assistant Program Director
University of Pittsburgh Emergency Medicine Residency
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

 

From the Editor

Thank you for buying the print companion to PEER . The PEER self-assessment educational series has been used by tens of thousands of emergency physicians since 1974 to review the clinical practice of emergency medicine. For more than 40 years, it has guided our studying for national board exams, including the in-training, certifying, and continuous certification.

Over the past 10 years, the exams and the technology used to study and take them have changed a lot. The College’s responsibility, then, is to change PEER to make sure that our experience with it is as close to the “real thing” as possible. Since all American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) examinations are now administered on computers, PEER is primarily a digital experience: this print companion is an excellent “add-on” study tool, but you’ll get the full PEER experience by buying an annual membership to the online edition. That’s where you’ll create practice tests and simulated exams and earn CME credit. You can find more information on that on the next page.

Staying in step with ABEM and transforming PEER are exciting, but it’s also nice to say that some things haven’t changed. The PEER mission is still to be “closest to the boards.” The Editorial Board, as always, chose the topics for PEER questions from the current version of “The Model of the Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine.” As always, the number of questions in each category closely mirrors that of the EM Model. With only a few exceptions, all answer explanations in PEER are referenced to at least two up-to-date resources. As hard as we’ve worked to write questions that read like real Board questions, we know it’s the answer explanations that separate PEER from other resources – each one explains the correct answer and the foils, and each one covers key testable concepts about the topic rather than just the specific question posed, thus preparing you to correctly answer more than one question on that condition or concept. Finally, as with previous editions, the PEER questions are all new. (Although we updated and revised four questions from PEER VIII at press time to give us a nice round number.) The Editorial Board and I have worked hard to ensure that the answers and explanations are as accurate as possible, but please remember that information in PEER should not be used to make decisions regarding standard of care.

Whether you’re “all in” on the new transformed PEER—joining with an annual membership and buying the print companion as an add-on—or just using this “hard copy” to study, I hope PEER becomes a valued study tool for you to review the essentials of emergency medicine. As our residents have praised in the past, the Editorial Board and all our contributors have worked hard to make this “the closest thing to taking the Boards.”

 

Mary Jo Wagner, MD, FACEP, Editor-in-Chief

June 2017

2017 / Spiral bound, Two-book set, Questions book + Answers book / 8.5x11 / ACEP
Pages: Question book 176, Answers book 572
 
"… it was eerie how many exact questions were on the test that I had seen on PEER VIII and PEER IX. I was skeptical. With the limited number of questions in the PEER bank when compared to the other competitors, I doubted that it would even be a worthwhile resource, but I was wrong. Very high yield questions and foils."

David V. Le, MD • San Antonio, Texas

Everyone who has earned the right to take the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) qualifying examination has endured countless assessments along the way. Although this has no doubt led to much strife and trepidation, we can finally take solace in the fact that this particular examination, in theory, carries a unique applicability to the daily practice of emergency medicine.

The changing landscape of technology has led to significant changes in the way we access our information. Test takers now have a multitude of options to choose from when selecting their preferred method of test preparation. One constant in all of this turnover is the ubiquitous value of practice questions.

PEER IX succeeds in offering a full-length practice examination with questions that are representative of the qualifying examination. The questions in PEER IX are stimulating and expansive, covering nearly every relevant topic. Readers are further rewarded with richly engaging explanations and analysis on why each of the other choices is incorrect. These discussions should not be overlooked because the answer for even the most simple question carries several teaching points.

Its greatest value is also its greatest impediment. The questions so closely mimic what will likely be seen on the actual examination that it can be frustrating at times. For instance, having to choose the most sensitive complaint for someone with a pulmonary embolus (chest pain or dyspnea?) or the most specific test for viral encephalitis is both esoteric and immaterial to the practice of emergency medicine. Controversial topics such as the use of cuffed versus uncuffed tubes are not shied away from, which can make ascertaining the correct answer difficult. However, such is the reality of the ABEM examination.

The resource that most closely compares to PEER IX is Rosh Review. The largest difference is that PEER IX is available in both written and digital format. However, there is something to be said for the simplicity of Rosh Review because its questions and explanations are more concise and seemingly clinically relevant.

As emergency physicians, most of us are cursed with a short attention span. Although it may not be feasible for all, the book is best used when questions are taken in blocks. The more one is accustomed to sitting for a time, answering lengthy questions and pacing oneself, the more comfortable he or she will feel when actually taking the test.

With so many types of resources now available, examinees have likely found a consistently efficacious blueprint for how to achieve maximum success in test taking. The value of practice questions cannot be doubted. A good question book will educate the reader without crushing him or her underneath the minutiae; it will replicate the actual test as closely as possible. To this end, PEER IX should be considered a success.


Questions that read like a real board exam
All PEER questions are written as close to “board style” as possible. Each one includes a detailed explanation of why the correct answer is correct, and why the “foils” are wrong.

   
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